Harrison Attorney Recognized For Pro Bono Work

  • Comment
Rye Brook's David A. Sausen, Hartsdale's Robert H. Hermann and Harrison's Eric C. Woglom were among 18 recipients statewide honored with the New York State Bar Association’s 2014 President’s Pro Bono Service Award.
Rye Brook's David A. Sausen, Hartsdale's Robert H. Hermann and Harrison's Eric C. Woglom were among 18 recipients statewide honored with the New York State Bar Association’s 2014 President’s Pro Bono Service Award. Photo Credit: Contributed
Rye Brook's David A. Sausen was among 18 recipients statewide honored with the New York State Bar Association’s 2014 President’s Pro Bono Service Award.
Rye Brook's David A. Sausen was among 18 recipients statewide honored with the New York State Bar Association’s 2014 President’s Pro Bono Service Award. Photo Credit: Contributed
Hartsdale's Robert H. Hermann was among 18 recipients statewide honored with the New York State Bar Association’s 2014 President’s Pro Bono Service Award.
Hartsdale's Robert H. Hermann was among 18 recipients statewide honored with the New York State Bar Association’s 2014 President’s Pro Bono Service Award. Photo Credit: Contributed

HARRISON, N.Y. -- Three Westchester attorneys are being recognized for their pro bono work. 

Rye Brook's David A. Sausen, Hartsdale's Robert H. Hermann and Harrison's Eric C. Woglom were among 18 recipients statewide honored with the New York State Bar Association’s 2014 President’s Pro Bono Service Award for their volunteer legal work in the community, according to a press release. The awards were presented on April 30 at the State Bar Center in Albany by State Bar President David M. Schraver of Rochester (Nixon Peabody) and President-elect Glenn Lau-Kee of Manhattan (Kee & Lau-Kee).

“Pro bono service is one of the proudest traditions of the legal profession. Each year, attorneys give generously of themselves to change someone’s life for the better,” said Schraver. “We are pleased to recognize an outstanding group of recipients. They truly do the public good.”

Sausen, of Rye Brook, was honored for his extensive pro bono work advising nonprofit organizations on compliance, operational and tax issues, according to the release.

"During 2013, Sausen advised more than 20 different organizations across vari­ous fields, including charter schools in New York City; the Harlem Family Institute, which treats children with psychological problems in free clinics; GiGi’s Playhouse, a community center specifically designed to support individuals with Down syndrome and their families; and the Trans Justice Funding Project, a community funding initiative supporting grass-roots groups run by and for transgendered people. His pro bono work also has benefited organizations that serve the poor around the globe," representatives said in the release. 

Hermann, of Hartsdale, was honored for his work with DelBello, Donnellan, Weingarten, Wise & Wiederkehr of White Plains.  

"He is co-counsel on an important federal lawsuit alleging that HUD and New York State Homes and Community Renewal allowed low-income and disabled residents at a Yonkers housing project to be threatened with eviction after their landlord charged them exorbitant and legally questionable electrical rates. He also serves as a role model and mentor to Legal Services staff attorneys, sharing with them his vast knowledge of litigation strategies and negotiation tactics," representatives said in the release. 

Retired patent attorney Woglom, of Harrison, was recognized for his pro bono work with Bronx CLARO, where he has been volunteering since 2011.

"Sponsored by the Bronx County Bar Association, Fordham Law School and the New York City Bar, the Bronx CLARO program conducts weekly clinics where he provides assistance on consumer debt collection issues for unrepresented consumers facing lawsuits. He distinguished himself in dealing with complex cases: conducting extensive independent research, pursuing advice from consumer law experts, and helping litigants step by step to navigate the court process to more effectively assert their rights and defenses," representatives said in the release. 

  • Comment

Comments