Harrison's Preston School Hosts Interactive Art Show

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The Samuel J. Preston School recently hosted an interactive art show.
The Samuel J. Preston School recently hosted an interactive art show. Photo Credit: Harrison Central School District
Every student in the school had at least one piece in the show.
Every student in the school had at least one piece in the show. Photo Credit: Harrison Central School District
Students used Adobe Photoshop to create artwork.
Students used Adobe Photoshop to create artwork. Photo Credit: Harrison Central School District

HARRISON, N.Y. -- The Samuel J. Preston school recently hosted a schoolwide interactive art show.

Under the direction of art teacher Melissa Sgrulletta, both two- and three-dimensional artwork was on display. Every student in the school had at least one piece in the show.

The inspiration for the artwork varied and included children's books "Where the Wild Things Are" by Maurice Sendak, pop culture Disney's "Monsters University," artwork created by famous artists Wassily Kandinsky and Vincent Van Gogh, as well as nature.

The art curriculum focuses on scaffolding art skills and techniques rooted in the art elements of line, shape, color, form, texture, space and value.

"I tell the students all the time, 'Everyone is an artist.' The schoolwide art show features each student in our school. They all get to share their work with their families and feel a sense of pride and accomplishment," said Sgrulletta.

Under the direction of Thomasine Mastrantoni, library media specialist, the interactive component featured fourth- and fifth-grade student docents teaching parents and students the techniques used in creating artwork using Adobe Photoshop. Fourth-grade student docents Trinity Corbett and Anthony Plunkett demonstrated tools in Adobe Photoshop that they used to create a mixed-media project inspired by Edvard Munch's "The Scream."

Fifth-grade student docents Britney Venegas, Drake Martin and Jamie Sandomenico demonstrated tools in Adobe Photoshop that they used to create a self-portrait inspired by Andy Warhol and the pop art movement.

"When students can teach others what they have learned, they have achieved a high level of understanding and success," said Sgrulletta and Mastrantoni.

"Mrs. Sgrulletta and I integrate technology into several units of art instruction in different grade levels. We are so happy we can provide our students with opportunities to experience using technology as a way to create art," said Mastrantoni. 

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